4 Ways Dogs Show Love

Dogs are excellent pets that have proven their loyalty and love for humans over the years. Many household have dogs as pets.

These canine companions provide security for their owners and serve multiple functions in various homes. Dogs have been adopted as a means of therapy for certain individuals, and they also aid visually impaired people – these are just a few things among the many other functions that dogs serve.

The nature of dogs has made humanity to fall in love with them. The dynamic bond between humans and their pet dogs can be seen all around. People of all ages enjoy having them around. Dogs are highly intelligent animals that express themselves in many different ways. This article addresses 4 different ways by which dogs express their love for us.

If you’re able to tell when your dog is showing love to you, it will help to strengthen the bond between you two.

Here are some ways through which your dog could express its love:

1. Eye Contact

First is eye contact. There’s a lot of truth that reflects in the eyes. When you’re staring into your dog’s eyes, you can sense the love that exists between you two.

Based on extensive research, it has been discovered that anytime you’re staring into your dog’s eyes, there’s a rise in the level of oxytocin in the dog’s system. This oxytocin is a chemical that affects feelings of love and closeness in dogs.

As you stare into your dog’s eyes, you need to keep in mind that another dog could react differently. Dogs that aren’t closely related to you can take eye contact as a direct confrontation – which could be dangerous. Also, it could be the fact that you are holding a bag of delicious dog treats too!

2. Face Licking

Another common experience with dogs is face licking. If you have a dog, you’d have probably experienced this many times.

This is a means by which your dog expresses its love for you. Baby dogs have a higher tendency to perform this action that older ones. If you were worried about a dog being hostile, you can calm down if it starts licking your face. This is usually a sign of friendliness. One other reason for licking in dogs is the need to clean their body.

It’s common for dogs to lick their coat in an attempt to remove dirt. Therefore, if your dog starts licking your face, it might just be trying to give you a saliva bath and get you clean.

3. Tail Wagging

This is an act that’s popularly associated with dogs. When your dog wags its tail, there are many messages the pooch could be passing. This act is not restricted to only feelings of excitement, but it could reflect a warning, uneasy feeling, and even show that the dog is afraid. If the dog is calm, your canine friend won’t wag its tail around so much.

The happier, excitement-related, wagging is usually wholesome; the entire backside is in a gyration along with the wagging tail. Generally, a happy tail wag has its unique welcoming aura.

Don’t forget to brush your dog’s tail frequently too!

4. Jumping

Lastly, your dog’s love can be reflected through jumping. If you own a dog, you may have, on different occasions, been taken by surprise when your dog jumped at you as you entered the apartment.

This is usually a sign that your dog has missed you and is excited to see you at home. However, if you don’t want your dog to jump on you whenever you walk through the door – maybe you’re carrying a fragile package – you can train your pooch to greet you in a calmer manner. 

Conclusion

Clearly, dogs are great companions in the home. They are friendly, loyal, and affectionate animals. They are also highly intelligent.

If you’re a dog owner, you would have experienced, first hand, the loving nature of these canine wonders. Dogs protect their owners and do many other things to show their love. If you can successfully tell when your dog is showing its affection and attraction to you, it will boost your bond with dear Fido.

Making use of the information provided in this article, you can start paying closer attention to the different behaviors your dog exhibits.

Bio

Pete Decker is the lead editor at TheGoodyPet.com. For the past 20 years, Pete has been working professionally with dogs, and he has spent time volunteering in animal shelters across USA and around the world. Now, Pete dedicates his time towards TheGoodyPet, a pet educational website made by pet lovers for pet lovers.

You can find more from Pete on his website, TheGoodyPet.com  or by following TheGoodyPet on Twitter or Facebook.